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Alcohol addiction and alcoholism are problems in the state of Washington which affect every community in the state. Thousands of individuals are negatively impacted on a daily basis by the destruction that is caused as a result of alcohol addiction. The need for alcohol rehab and alcohol treatment in the area has never been greater.

Alcohol Rehabilitation and alcohol treatment in Washington offers effective solutions for those affected by alcohol addiction and alcoholism. Individuals battling alcohol addiction in Washington can avail themselves of the many alcohol rehab programs available in the area. As part of treatment, individuals will receive the vital counseling and support they need to get to the root of their addiction. Effective alcohol treatment and alcohol rehab in Washington will empower the individual to begin making positive choices in their lives. They will learn to overcome life's obstacles with effective reasoning instead of alcohol, and can begin rebuilding their lives and mend important relationships.

For long time alcoholics in Washington, physical withdrawal may occur when they suddenly quit drinking alcohol. Withdrawal is a very uncomfortable and painful process, and can be potentially deadly. Individuals in Washington who want to quit drinking and seek treatment can be assisted through this process at an alcohol rehab facility. Here they can properly monitored and care for, to make it as smooth a process as possible.

There are a number of alcohol rehabs available for individuals in Washington seeking treatment for alcohol addiction. There are Long-term Alcohol Rehabilitation Programs, Outpatient Alcohol Rehabs, Short-term Alcohol Treatment Programs, Inpatient Alcohol Rehabilitation Facilities, support group meetings, alcohol counseling, halfway houses and sober living.

Alcohol addiction and alcoholism can have serious long-term consequences, and can ultimately take your life. Seek alcohol treatment and rehabilitation in Washington for you or someone you know today, before it is too late.


Washington alcohol related information and statistics are provided by the US Dept. of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Conference of State Legislatures, 2004. Washington, alcohol-related driving deaths were highest in 1982 with 482, which was the first year of reporting, and peaked again in 1990, with 475. These alcohol related fatalities dropped to a low of 225 in 2008. The percentage of traffic fatalities that were alcohol related went from a high of 64% in 1982, to a low of 40% in 2007. In 2008, out of all traffic fatalities, 35% involved a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 or higher, down from 60% in 1982.

The table below shows the total number of traffic fatalities (Tot) for the Washington, alcohol related fatalities (Alc-Rel) and fatalities in crashes where the highest BAC in the crash was 0.08 or above (0.08+). It is important to note that the Washington drunk driving statistics, as shown below, include data from individuals who were in an alcohol-related crash, but not driving a motor vehicle at the time. The U.S. Department of Transportation defines alcohol-related deaths as "fatalities that occur in crashes where at least one driver or non-occupant (pedestrian or bicyclist) involved in the crash has a positive Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) value."

All 50 states in the US now apply two statutory offenses to driving under the influence of alcohol. The first (and original) offense is known either as driving under the influence (DUI), driving while intoxicated/impaired (DWI), or operating [a motor vehicle] while intoxicated/impaired (OWI). This is based upon a Washington police officer's observations (driving behavior, slurred speech, the results of a roadside sobriety test, etc.) The second offense is called "illegal per se", which is driving with a BAC of 0.08% or higher. Since 2002 it has been illegal in all 50 states to drive with a BAC that is 0.08% or higher.

Year

Fatalities

Tot

Alc-Rel

%

0.08+

%

1982

748

482

64

445

60

1983

698

421

60

374

54

1984

746

421

56

365

49

1985

744

407

55

351

47

1986

703

422

60

364

52

1987

780

431

55

382

49

1988

778

464

60

415

53

1989

781

428

55

372

48

1990

825

475

58

411

50

1991

682

370

54

325

48

1992

651

339

52

297

46

1993

661

340

51

308

47

1994

640

317

49

274

43

1995

653

322

49

277

42

1996

712

361

51

311

44

1997

674

304

45

257

38

1998

662

313

47

269

41

1999

637

274

43

249

39

2000

631

286

45

241

38

2001

649

281

43

242

37

2002

658

299

45

267

41

2003

600

259

43

228

38

2004

563

246

44

223

40

2005

647

294

45

253

39

2006

630

269

43

225

36

2007

568

230

40

195

34

2008

521

225

43

182

35



2003-2004 Washington Alcohol Related Issue: Percentage % Ranking

Alcohol Abuse or Dependence

8.35%

[17th of 51]

Alcohol consumption > Binge drinkers

14.2%

[31st of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Casual drinkers

60.5%

[12th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Heavy drinkers

4.8%

[26th of 52]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities

246

[27th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities (per capita)

0.391 per 10,000 people

[42nd of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities, as a percentage

44%

[13th of 51]

Alcohol Use in the Past Month

56.6%

[11th of 51]

Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2003-2004, Office of Applied Studies 2003-2004 and the MADD Official Website statistics 2004

When is a driver considered to be legally drunk in Washington?

  • Non-commercial drivers in Washington age 21+ are considered legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .08 or more.
  • Drivers of commercial vehicles are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .04 percent or greater. In Washington, school bus drivers are commercial drivers.
  • Drivers under 21 are legally drunk in Washington when there is any detectable amount of alcohol in their system.

Penalties for Drunk Driving in Washington

  • A first-time offender in Washington whose BAC was less than .15 faces up to one year in prison and a fine of $300 to $5,000. If the offender's BAC was .15 or more, the fine is between $500 and $5,000.
  • A person who commits a second DUI in Washington within seven years of the first offense and whose BAC was less than .15 faces up to one year in prison and 50 days of electronic home monitoring. The fine is $500 to $5,000. If, however, the offender's BAC was .15 or more, the electronic monitoring period is up to 90 days and the fine is between $750 and $5,000.
  • A person who commits a third or fourth DUI in Washington within seven years and whose BAC was less than .15 faces 90 days to one year in prison and 120 days of electronic home monitoring. The fine is between $1,000 and $5,000. If, however, the offender had a BAC of .15 or more, the prison term is 120 days to one year and 150 days of electronic home monitoring. The fine is between $1,500 and $5,000.
  • A person who commits a fifth DUI in Washington within 10 years faces up to eight years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000.

Driver's License Suspension/Revocation Periods

If the offender's BAC was less than .15, the following suspension/revocation periods apply:

  • For a first offense in Washington, the suspension period is 90 days.
  • For a second offense in Washington within seven years, the offender's driver's license will be revoked for two years.
  • For a third or subsequent offense in Washington within seven years, the offender's driver's license will be revoked for three years.

If the offender's BAC was .15 or more, the following revocation periods apply:

  • For a first offense in Washington, the revocation period is one year.
  • For a second offense in Washington within seven years, the revocation period is 900 days.
  • Where there have been two or more prior offenses in Washington within seven years, the revocation period is four years.

Enhanced Penalty for Drunk Driving While a Child Under 16 is in the Vehicle

If a person is convicted of DUI in Washington while a passenger 16 or under was in the vehicle, the sentencing judge is required to order the offender to use an ignition interlock device. In cases where installation of an ignition interlock device was not mandatory under Washington law, the judge must order use of the device for at least 60 days following restoration of the offender's driving privileges. In cases where installation of the device was mandatory, the judge must order use of the device for an additional 60 days.

Ignition Interlock

If a person is convicted of DUI in Washington, a judge may order use of an ignition interlock device. If a person is convicted of DUI, the Department of Licensing of the State of Washington, however, will require that the offender to drive only a vehicle that is equipped with an ignition interlock device for the following time periods:

  • For a person who has not previously been restricted to use an ignition interlock device, a period of one year.
  • For a person who has previously been restricted to use an ignition interlock device by a judge, a period of five years.
  • For a person who has previously been restricted by the Department of Licensing, a period of 10 years.

Commercial Drivers

In addition to other penalties that may apply under Washington's DUI laws, a commercial driver who commits a first DUI while driving any vehicle will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for at least one year. If, however, the driver was operating a commercial vehicle and transporting hazardous materials at the time, the disqualification period is three years. A commercial driver in Washington who commits a second DUI while driving any vehicle will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for life, which may or may not be reduced to a period of not less than 10 years.

Drivers Under 21

A person under 21 commits underage DUI in Washington if he or she drives with a BAC of .02 but less than .08. Underage DUI offenders face up to 90 days in jail, a fine of up to $1,000, or both. Depending on the circumstances of the offense and the minor's age at the time, the driver's license suspension period could be until the minor turns 21.

Dram Shop

Washington State does not have a Dram Shop Act. It may be possible, however, for an injured person to bring a negligence action against a licensed drinking establishment if the person's injury resulted from the tavern's negligent sale and service of alcohol to a minor or to a visibly intoxicated person.

Criminal Liability for Selling or Furnishing Alcohol to a Minor

It is a crime to sell or furnish alcohol to a person under 21. Violators face up to 90 days in jail, a fine of up to $1,000, or both. This law, however, does not apply to parents who permit their underage child to drink in their presence, so long as the consumption is not at a licensed drinking establishment.

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  • Individuals with a Blood Alcohol level of .15 (about four to seven drinks per hour for the average teen) is 380 times more likely to die in a single vehicle crash than a sober person.
  • Genes play a role in ones alcoholism, but other factors such as lifestyle and stress contribute to a person's risk of becoming alcoholic.
  • Many people who apparently die from overdoses of sleeping pills (barbiturates), actually die from a combination of alcohol and the medication.
  • Once an alcoholic starts drinking, there is little they can do to manage how much alcohol they will consume at any given time.